MARAD recycles old ships into academy funding

National Defense Reserve Fleet vessels National Defense Reserve Fleet vessels U.S. Navy photograph

JANUARY 29, 2014 — The U.S. Maritime Administration today announced that America's six state maritime academies – California Maritime Academy, Great Lakes Maritime Academy, Maine Maritime Academy, Massachusetts Maritime Academy, SUNY Maritime College, and Texas Maritime Academy – and the United States Merchant Marine Academy (USMMA) in Kings Point, NY, will each receive $1 million from a government program that recycles obsolete vessels.

 "The most important element in our U.S. Merchant Marine fleet is our people," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. "This funding will help ensure that dedicated men and women of our maritime academies continue to have the resources that make them the best educated and most highly trained mariners anywhere."

The money for this round of funding came from the sale for recycling of obsolete vessels from the Maritime Administration's National Defense Reserve Fleet. As required by the National Maritime Heritage Act, 25 percent of the profit from sales is distributed to maritime academies for facility and training ship maintenance, repair, and modernization, and for the purchase of simulators and fuel; 25 percent is provided to the National Park Service, which provides grants for maritime heritage activities through the National Maritime Heritage Grants Program; and 50 percent funds the acquisition, maintenance, and repair of vessels in the National Defense Reserve Fleet.

 "The Maritime Administration continues to focus on the future of our maritime industry," said Acting Maritime Administrator Paul "Chip" Jaenichen. "We're proud to support the education that prepares the next generation of maritime professionals for the challenges they will face."

Since 2009, the Maritime Administration has provided more than $8.9 million in funding generated from vessel sales to the state academies and the United States Merchant Marine Academy.

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