Forty five graduate Ingalls Apprentice School

Forty-five students representing various crafts graduated from Ingalls Shipbuilding's Apprentice School on Saturday. Since 1952, the Apprentice School has produced more than 4,000 graduates in support of Ingalls' operational needs Forty-five students representing various crafts graduated from Ingalls Shipbuilding's Apprentice School on Saturday. Since 1952, the Apprentice School has produced more than 4,000 graduates in support of Ingalls' operational needs Photo by Andrew Young/HII

AUGUST 25, 2015 — Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) held a graduation ceremony Saturday for graduates of Ingalls Shipbuilding's Apprentice School. The ceremony celebrated the accomplishments of 45 students representing various crafts at Ingalls.

Since 1952, the Apprentice School has produced more than 4,000 graduates in support of Ingalls' operational needs.

The program offers a comprehensive two- to four-year curriculum for students interested in shipbuilding careers.

More than 60 faculty and staff deliver 13 programs and over 120 course offerings to apprentices to gain not only the skills, knowledge and pride of workmanship, but also the educational foundation and personal qualities needed to fully meet the challenges of a shipbuilding career.

Today more than 1,500 apprentice alumnae fill approximately 50 different types of jobs at Ingalls, from pipe welders to senior executives.

"Knowing that you've helped build these ships as they sail away and join the fleet should make you and your family proud—every day," said U.S. Navy Capt. Joe Tuite, commanding officer, Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast, the featured speaker at Saturday's ceremony. "Every bolt, every hose and every pipe will have been carefully placed by you and the Ingalls team. As those banners in the shipyard say: Know that what you do most certainly matters. It matters to your partners at Supervisor of Shipbuilding Gulf Coast, who work alongside you to provide the Navy with the finest seaworthy ships. It matters to the parents of every sailor and every Marine, who trust their sons and daughters to your handiwork. And it matters to every American who sleeps better knowing our troops deploy with the most state-of-the-art vessels on the seas."

"As you go to work next week as an apprentice graduate, I would like to challenge you to choose to make a difference and make sure what you do each day matters," said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. "You have already chosen to start down the path to be an Ingalls leader, and your future is bright and full of tremendous opportunities. You are the future of Ingalls Shipbuilding. Ingalls is great, not just because of the facilities, but because of the people. The people make Ingalls special."

"The slogan 'What you do today matters' means the job you perform should last a lifetime," said welder Jason Carter, the class' outstanding apprentice of the year. "The quality you put down today might affect somebody's life or a crew's life somewhere in the future. We're building ships for the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard to protect our country. That matters."

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