Ingalls Shipbuilding christens fourth NSC

Linda Kapral Papp, the ship's sponsor for the National Security Cutter Hamilton (WMSL 753), breaks the ceremonial bottle across the bow of the ship on Oct. 26 at Ingalls Shipbuilding. Also pictured are (left to right) U.S. Coast Guard Capt. Douglas Fears, the ship's prospective commanding officer; Adm. Robert J. Papp Jr., commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard; and Ingalls Shipbuilding President Irwin F. Edenzon. Linda Kapral Papp, the ship's sponsor for the National Security Cutter Hamilton (WMSL 753), breaks the ceremonial bottle across the bow of the ship on Oct. 26 at Ingalls Shipbuilding. Also pictured are (left to right) U.S. Coast Guard Capt. Douglas Fears, the ship's prospective commanding officer; Adm. Robert J. Papp Jr., commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard; and Ingalls Shipbuilding President Irwin F. Edenzon. Photo by Steve Blount

OCTOBER 28, 2013 — Huntington Ingalls Industries' (NYSE:HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division christened the National Security Cutter (NSC) Hamilton (WMSL 753) Saturday.

Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Robert J. Papp Jr. was the keynote speaker at event.

"I can count among our most satisfying accomplishments over the last several years that we have the construction of at least eight National Security Cutters in our sight," he told the audience of nearly 1,000 guests.

Adm. Papp's wife, Linda Kapral Papp, is the ship's sponsor. She smashed a ceremonial bottle across the ship's bow, officially christening WMSL 753 as the "Hamilton."

The ship is the fourth NSC Ingalls has built for the U.S. Coast Guard and is named in honor of Alexander Hamilton, who is credited with establishing the Revenue Cutter Service, the forerunner of today's U.S. Coast Guard. It is the third Coast Guard cutter to bear the name Hamilton.

NSCs are 418 feet long with a 54-foot beam and displace 4,500 tons with a full load. They have a top speed of 28 knots, a range of 12,000 miles, an endurance of 60 days and a crew of 110.

"In the past decade, we've added to our 75-year legacy by building the most capable Coast Guard cutters in the world for the most capable Coast Guard in the world," said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Irwin F. Edenzon. "We understand these great ships must be affordable. And the Coast Guard's management of the NSC program has helped. Stable funding, timely contract negotiations and a disciplined appetite for change allow us to get learning from ship to ship. It gives both us and the Coast Guard the best opportunity to achieve our mutual objective: to keep building NSCs at an affordable price so we can build more NSCs. And not only do our shipbuilders know that the ships we build have to be affordable, they know who serves in them: Coast Guard men and women, sailors and Marines who are our friends, our neighbors, our sons, daughters, nieces and nephews—America's heroes."

U.S. Rep. Steven Palazzo (R-Miss.) also took part in the ceremony. "Huntington Ingalls is more than a business, it is a family," he said. "A family 75 years old with a firm legacy and a robust future. As south Mississippians, shipbuilding is a part of our family and will remain the cornerstone of our community and the strength of our country.

"Whether it is drug interdiction, counterterrorism or our Homeland Security missions, this ship will be one of the greatest tools in our nation's tool kit for the protection of our homeland and the safety of our citizens," Rep. Palazzo added. "Simply put, these ships are essential in maintaining the safety and security of our nation, and most of all, these ships are responsible for returning the men and women of the Coast Guard safely to their families, a mission that none of us take lightly."

NSCs are the flagship of the Coast Guard's cutter fleet, designed to replace the 378‐foot Hamilton-class High-Endurance Cutters, which entered service during the 1960s. Ingalls has delivered three and has three more under construction, including Hamilton. Keel laying for Ingalls' fifth NSC, James (WMSL 754), took place on May 17. The ship is currently 33 percent complete and will launch the spring of 2014. Ingalls has started construction on 28 of 45 units for NSC 6 and she will launch the fall of 2015. An advance long lead material procurement contract has also been awarded for a seventh NSC.

Linda Kapral Papp, the ship's sponsor for the National Security Cutter Hamilton (WMSL 753), breaks the ceremonial bottle across the bow of the ship on Oct. 26 at Ingalls Shipbuilding. Also pictured are (left to right) U.S. Coast Guard Capt. Douglas Fears, the ship's prospective commanding officer; Adm. Robert J. Papp Jr., commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard; and Ingalls Shipbuilding President Irwin F. Edenzon. Photo by Steve Blount

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