MTU premiers ship automation system for the future

With Callosum and its latest Equipment Health Monitoring (EHM) capability, Rolls-Royce says it is "able to offer the automation system of the future on a platform that has been convincingly proven many times over under operational conditions." With Callosum and its latest Equipment Health Monitoring (EHM) capability, Rolls-Royce says it is "able to offer the automation system of the future on a platform that has been convincingly proven many times over under operational conditions."

SEPTEMBER 8, 2017 — Rolls-Royce will premier the new Equipment Health Monitoring function available with MTU's Callosum Ship Automation System at the DSEI Defense and Security Exhibition in London (September 12–15). The Callosum extension provides a real-time picture of the status of the vessel and its propulsion system.

Callosum utilizes the latest analysis techniques and machine learning based on digital measurement data to prevent faults and match maintenance to actual equipment condition. As a result, maintenance needs and life-cycle costs are reduced to a minimum whilst availability and planning reliability for operational forces are increased.

Visitors to the exhibition will be able to view a simulation of the EHM extension for Callosum that today already meets the requirements modern naval forces can expect to encounter in future.

Rolls-Royce will also use DSEI to showcase the entire portfolio of MTU propulsion and drive solutions for naval vessels and land-based defense vehicles from frigates and submarines to armored fighting vehicles.

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