Ingalls Shipbuilding launches DDG 114

Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Ralph Johnson (DDG 114) on December 12 Ingalls Shipbuilding launched the Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Ralph Johnson (DDG 114) on December 12 Photo by Andrew Young/HI

DECEMBER 15, 2015 —Huntington Ingalls Industries' (NYSE:HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division launched Ralph Johnson (DDG 114), the company's 30th Arleigh Burke-class (DDG 51) guided missile destroyer, at its Pascagoula, MS, shipyard on December 12.


The ship was translated from the land level facility to the drydock which was slowly flooded until the ship was afloat.

"This is an exciting milestone and represents a significant amount of effort by our Navy and industry team to get the ship to this point" said Capt. Mark Vandroff, DDG 51 class program manager, Program Executive Office (PEO) Ships. "We're looking forward to completing outfitting efforts, undergoing test and trials and delivering another highly-capable asset to our Fleet."

"The last week of translating this quality ship across land and then launching it from our drydock is no small task, and our shipbuilders accomplished it in a very efficient manner," said George Nungesser, Ingalls' DDG 51 program manager. "All crafts and personnel making up this DDG shipbuilding crew have performed very well, and we were able to launch DDG 114 ahead of schedule. It's a nice milestone to accomplish as we end the year."

Ingalls has built and delivered 28 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. There are currently four more under construction at Ingalls, including Ralph Johnson, which is scheduled to be christened in the spring of 2016.

John Finn (DDG 113) was christened in May and is expected to undergo sea trials in 2016. Paul Ignatius (DDG 117) celebrated her keel-authentication milestone in October and is expected to launch in the first half of 2017. Delbert D. Black (DDG 119) started construction in July and is scheduled for keel laying in the second quarter of 2016.

DDG 114 is named to honor Pfc. Ralph Henry Johnson, who was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions that saved others during the Vietnam War. Johnson shouted a warning to his fellow Marines and hurled himself on an explosive device, saving the life of one Marine and preventing the enemy from penetrating his sector of the patrol's perimeter. Johnson died instantly. The Charleston, S.C., native had only been in Vietnam for two months and a few days when he was killed at the age of 20.

The highly capable Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles.


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