HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE 1999 ISSUES OF

The full content of each monthly issue of MARINE LOG is NOT available on line. The material here is a "taster" intended to persuade you to pay for a subscription. The price of an annual subscription to Marine Log is $35 (U.S. and Canada -- all other countries $60).

To order a subscription call 1-800 895 4389

If you buy or specify the types of products and services supplied by Marine Log advertisers, you may qualify for a FREE subscription to the print MARINE LOG. Use our registration form to apply on-line.

 

Regular monthly departments

HIGHLIGHTS FROM
THE NOVEMBER 1999
PRINT MARINE LOG

SHIPS OF THE CENTURY
A portfolio of some of the most significant vessels delivered in the past 100 yeras

SUPER SHIP: VOYAGER OF THE SEAS
Royal Caribbean's latest delivery gives BIG a new meaning

CLEANER. GREENER & SAFER
IMO Assembly sets shipping's regulatory agenda for well into the 21st Century

MORE CHANGE ON THE RADAR
A look at likely developments in Marine Electronics

Special Advertising Supplement:
WEBSITE DIRECTORY

 

Regular monthly departments

 HIGHLIGHTS FROM
THE NOVEMBER 1999
PRINT MARINE LOG

MUSCLING UP FOR THE OFFSHORE REBOUND
Demad for Gulf of Mexico E&P is bouncing back. But to get back into the game, players first have to pump up their financials on Wall Street

CRUISE SHIPPING: IT'S ABOUT BRANDING
Cruise lines are selling excitement, not just space aboard ship

WELL STIMULATION VESSEL R.C. BAKER
Bender delivers a 220 ft specialized workboat

FAR EAST YARDS WIDEN THEIR FOCUS
It's not just tankers and bulkers anymore

FERRIES TO THE RESCUE IN TURKEY
How Istanbul's ferries helped survivors cope with the horrors of a major earthquake

A GIANT EMERGES
The Friede Goldman Halter merger creates a significant new force in U.S. Shipbuilding

BAY AREA'S BOLD PLAN FOR FERRIES
New agency created to oversee ferry expansion


 

Regular monthly departments

HIGHLIGHTS FROM
THE OCTOBER 1999
PRINT MARINE LOG

MARITIME GERMANY
"Ruinous price pressures" from Korea are forcing German shipbuilders to scramble for new market niches.

PROPULSION: POWER PLAY IN TWO STROKE MARKET
The continuing demand for more output at the top end of the output spectrum has the two leading two stroke designers locked in a power struggle--and has helped gas turbine manufacturers two. Meanwhile, the race to get the first "smart" engine into commercial service has heated up--and IMO's air pollution prevention requirements are starting to impact the marketplace

FERRIES & FAST CRAFT: THE WIZARDS OF OZ
Marine Log Senior Editor John Snyder visits Australia to report on the latest developments by the world's leading designers and suppliers of high speed craft He also looks at Australians' Moans about Jones

COATINGS: TBT BAN LOOKS GOOD FOR DOGWHELKS, BUT NOT FOR SHIPOWNERS
A total ban on SBT-containing antifoulings seems a certainty, though the science behind it looks fuzzy

SHIPOWNERS WAIT FOR INTERNET-IN-THE-SKY
If your ship is a candidate for a C-band antenna, you can already access the World Wide Web. Most other shipowners, though, may have to wait for Teledesic's "Internet-in-the-Sky," though Inmarsat also has a solution in the works.

 

Regular monthly departments

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE SEPTEMBER 1999 MARINE LOG

COVER STORY

SHIP DESIGN'S SHARPER IMAGE

U.S. shipyards continue to refine their design and and production practices, as evidenced by these two case studies

Making builders of Navy ships
into expert cruise ship builders

Kvaerner Masa Marine (KMM), through Kvaerner Masa Yards - Technology (KMYT), is a part of the team working with Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Miss., a unit of Litton Ship Systems, to build two 72,000 gt cruise ships for American Classic Voyages.

Taking a new approach to 3D modeling
a new 3D modeling approach has helped Bender Shipbuilding & Repair Co., Inc., Mobile, Ala., substantially reduce the time and cost involved in building ships, by providing enhanced design products to be used in construction.

CANADIAN SHIPYARDS SEND OTTAWA A BLUEPRINT FOR SURVIVAL

TANKERS: CHEAP SHIPS AND MARKET
DIPS

HIGH SPEED FERRIES: MORE SCIENCE ON THOSE "KILLER WAVES"

NAVY TAKES AIM AT POLLUTION

Regular monthly departments

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE AUGUST 1999
print MARINE LOG

COVER STORY
WARSHIPS OF TOMORROW
Using gas turbines as the prime movers in an all electric ship? It's one of the options that the Navy is considering for its new generation destroyer

Cruising:
JAPANESE BREAKTHROUGH
With the orderbooks filling up in Europe, P&O has turned to Mitsubishi to build some of its new ships

IT: Communications
THE DAY THE MOUSE KILLED MORSE
The wireless telegraph may be dead, but terrestrial radio is still alive and kicking, and giving satcom and cellular a run for their money

Corrosion control:
NEW RUST BLOODHOUND
Recently introduced technology from Det Norske Veritas and Kongsberg Defense & Aerospace helps sniff out rust earlier

U.S. MARINE DIRECTORY:
Our essential, annual listing of:

REGULAR DEPARTMENTS

  • Editorial
  • Watching Washington
    Liberalizing CCF options. MarAd warning on substandard fleets. Softer stance on Y2K. Japan lags on port practice reforms
  • Marine Update
    FastShip dream moves closer to reality
  • Offshore Update
    ABS publishes guidance notes on synthetic moorings. Big bids for Brazil deepwater leases
  • Coastal & Inland Update
    California mulls design standards for marine oil terminals. Memco christens towboat
  • PLUS: Business Notes, People in the News,
    Marine Equipment News Product Literature,U.S. Shipbuilding Contracts, Shipyard News Marine Buyer's Guide
    Classified/Employment Advertising
    Web Sightings

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE JULY 1999 ISSUE

Fast craft: Attention turns
to cargo

While passenger demand continues to fuel continued growth in the high speed craft market, operators, designers and builders see untapped opportunities in the freight market

SHIP REPAIR
"Cheap" yards win
new friends
Alan Thorpe reports on the emergence of "new" repair regions that are undercutting established centers

FIRE & SAFETY
What's in the works at IMO
International regulations covering shipboard fire prevention and detection continue to evolve

GULF COAST HEADLINER
If it floats, it's built on the U.S. Gulf Coast. Our fifth annual regional supplement puts the facts and figures at your fingertips. Get a glimpse of this thriving $12 billion shipbuilding market--including a look at Wall Street's take on the Gulf Offshore sector

   

TO ORDER A COPY OF THE
FULL YEARBOOK ISSUE
CALL 1-800 895 4389

 HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE JUNE 1999 ISSUE

MARINE LOG's much-imitated annual Yearbook Issue takes a look at the state of play in KEY industry sectors.

WORLD SHIPBUILDING
Riding the rollercoaster

CRUISE SHIPPING
New ideas, new orders

WORLD SHIPPING
Here we go again...

U.S. SHIPBUILDING
The big squeeze

GULF OFFSHORE
Wall Street sweetens on oil stocks

BARGE OUTLOOK
Flat calm?

Highlights from January-May, 1999 issues

Highlights from June-December 1998 issues

Highlights from the December 1997 issue
Highlights from the November 1997 issue

Highlights from the October 1997 issue

Highlights from the September 1997 issue

Highlights from the August 1997 issue

Highlights from the July 1997 issue

Highlights from the June 1997 issue

Highlights from the May 1997 issue

Highlights from the April 1997 issue

Highlights from the March 1997 issue

Highlights from the February 1997 issue

Highlights from the January 1997 issue

 

 Highlights from 1996 issues

Back to home page