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August, 2008

From Marine Engineering to the digital MARINE LOG

Rotating covers

H.F. Donaldson, secretary and editor, led off the first issue of MARINE ENGINEERING by pointing out in his editorial that

"Marine Engineering is a product of whatever carefulness and judgment the editors possess, modified only by the difficulties incident to the construction of a technical journal. The record of the trial trip (of a vessel as well as a magazine) is apparent; when the machinery shall have been in operation long enough to properly adjust the bearings, better performance will be possible."

Back in Cleveland, Marine Review must have prospered, for on August 14, 1902, the Review acquired the Record and changed its name to-appropriately--Marine Review and Marine Record. In January, 1904, Marine Record was dropped from the Logo, and the magazine again was called Marine Review, retaining that name for 31 years.

By 1906, Marine Engineering had broadened both its editorial coverage and its circulation throughout the world enough to change its name to International Marine Engineering, and there was plenty to cover. The art of shipbuilding had grown out of the era of wood vessels and iron steamships, and progressed into the age of steel vessels. The marine steam turbine had become widely accepted, and marine technology generally was advancing rapidly. In 1920, International Marine Engineering, by then a healthy 78-page magazine bound with several 24-inch folded inserts illustrating vessel hull details, was purchased from H.L. Aldrich, who by that time was president and treasurer of the Aldrich Publishing Company, by its present owner, Simmons-Boardman Publishing Corporation.

For the next 15 years, the magazine was published as Marine Engineering and Shipping Age, possibly to give it a family resemblance to Simmons-Boardman's very successful railroad industry magazine, Railway Age. In the November, 1935 issue of its marine magazine, Simmons-Boardman announced that Marine Review, formerly published by Penton Publishing company of Cleveland, was merged with Marine Engineering and Shipping Age in one publication under the title Marine Engineering and Shipping Review. The announcement emphasized that"...Marine Engineering and Shipping Review unites the strength of two leading publications to serve the interests of the marine field with a high-speed, modern tool."

AND NOW WE'RE DIGITAL Another Simmons-Boardman acquisition in 1956 absorbed a western marine magazine, The Log, published by Miller-Freeman in San Francisco. As a result, Marine Engineering and Shipping Review was changed to Marine Engineering and The Log, then shortened to Marine Engineering/Log. The name was further shortened to Marine Log in November 1987.

Since 1987, the magazine has continued to mark significant milestones, the most recent of which include the launch of the digital Marine Log--it's about as close to putting the paper magazine on line as we can get ... for now.

Still in development is bringing audio and video content to the website, with some initial video starting to appear.

Meantime, if you have any copies of Marine Log's "ancestor" publications, LET US KNOW!

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